Bio-X the Economy

Biohack the Economy
Bio-Financiers

Biohack the Economy looks at possibles roles of biohacking and micro-organisms in shaping our financial futures, narrated through biological processes and model making. The project is based around a single one-million Greek Drachma note, first issued in 1944 in response to hyperinflation. Through development of special bio-printing technique, the designer enables direct replication of microbial fauna residing on the surface of the note, transforming an obsolete, and effectively ‘dead’ currency into a living and transient, ‘biological money’.

The living prints were then used as a starting point to ask questions about ways in which microbes could be implemented in our everyday lives, especially in the context of finance:How could these be grown, genetically programmed, and controlled as an alternative currency and/or commodity? And what are the social, cultural and political implications of such scenarios?

    Microbial bank (the 'farting pig'). Made from glass, silicone rubber and bacterial cultures.
Microbial bank (the ‘farting pig’). Made from glass, silicone rubber and bacterial cultures.
prints close up     Microbial prints of Drachma note
Microbial prints of Drachma note close-up
Drachma print - early experiment
Drachma print – early experiment
Scenarios close up
Scenarios close-ups
Installation consisted of microbial prints at the bottom and fictional scenarios at the top
whole shot     Project Installation: Mixed Media, including live microbial prints. Budafabriek, Kortrijk, Belgium. Shown as part of 'Green Light District' exhibition.
Project Installation: Mixed Media, including live microbial prints. Budafabriek, Kortrijk, Belgium. Shown as part of ‘Green Light District’ exhibition.
Coverage in De Standaard Newspaper
Coverage in De Standaard Newspaper
Features
Digital Weekend, London Design Festival, V&A Museum, London
Green Light District, Budafabriek, Kortrijk, Belgium
De Standaard Newspaper, Belgium & Netherlands

Special thanks
Imperial College Advanced Hackspace (ICAH)
Adam Peacock (3D modelling)